Immunisations (pre-school age)

Before starting school your child should receive all of the immunisations listed below to protect them from the most dangerous childhood diseases. 

You can get your baby and children immunised at your GP surgery, which will usually be done by the practice nurse. They will check the consent form and ensure your child is well and able to have their immunisations that day. If your child is unwell, you will be given a new appointment. You will need to take your Personal Child Health Record ('red book') with you so your child's record can be updated.

If your child has missed any of the vaccinations for any reason, please contact your GP surgery, who can book your child in.

Below is the vaccination schedule for babies and young children (correct as of April 2016):

8 weeks

  • 5-in-1 vaccine – this single jab contains vaccines to protect against five separate diseases: diphtheria, tetanus, whooping cough (pertussis), polio and Haemophilus influenzae type b (known as Hib – a bacterial infection that can cause severe pneumonia or meningitis in young children)
  • Pneumococcal (PCV) vaccine
  • Rotavirus vaccine
  • Meningitis B vaccine (new vaccine introduced September 2015)

12 weeks

16 weeks

One year (12 months)

2-6 years (including children in school years 1 and 2)

3 years and 4 months

If your child has missed any of the vaccinations for any reason, please contact your GP surgery, who can book your child in.

The next vaccines are then given aged 12-13 years (girls only - HPV vaccine which protects against cervical cancer), and then at 14 years, the 3-in-1 teenage booster against diphtheria, tetanus and polio, and also the Men ACWY vaccine.